Compose conference and New York City Haskell courses

Friday, 05 December 2014, by Andres Löh.
Filed under community, training, well-typed.

Well-Typed is happy to announce that we are sponsoring

C◦mp◦se conference

Friday, January 30 – Sunday, February 1, 2015, New York City

This conference is focused on functional programming and features a keynote by Stephanie Weirich on dependent types as well as invited talks by Anthony Cowley, Maxime Ransan and Don Syme, plus a whole lot of additional contributed talks. There’s also an “unconference” with small workshops and tutorials as well as the opportunity to get your hands dirty and try things out yourself.

For several years now, we have been running successful Haskell courses in collaboration in Skills Matter. For the C◦mp◦se conference, we have decided to bring theses courses to New York! You can participate in our Haskell courses directly before or directly after the conference (or both):

Fast Track to Haskell

Thursday, January 29 – Friday, January 30, 2015, New York City

(Don’t worry, there’s no overlap with Stephanie Weirich’s keynote on Friday evening that marks the start of C◦mp◦se.)

You can register here.

This course is for developers who want to learn about functional programming in general or Haskell in particular. It introduces important concepts such as algebraic datatypes, pattern matching, type inference, polymorphism, higher-order functions, explicit effects and, of course, monads and provides a compact tour with lots of hands-on exercises that provide a solid foundation for further adventures into Haskell or functional programming.

Advanced Haskell

Monday, February 2 – Tuesday, February 3, 2015, New York City

You can register here.

This course is for developers who have some experience in Haskell and want to know how to work on larger projects and how things scale. The course covers important topics such as selecting the right data structures for a task at hand, taking the functional perspective into account, and takes a thorough look at Haskell’s “lazy evaluation” and how to reason about time and space performance of Haskell programs. There’s also some focus on how to use Haskell’s powerful abstraction mechanisms and concepts such as Applicative Functors, Monads and Monad Transformers to help you organize larger code bases. Finally, depending on time and demand, there’s the opportunity to look at Parallelism and Concurrency, or at type-level programming. Once again, the course comes with several carefully designed hands-on exercises and provides room for specific questions that the participants might have.

Both courses will be taught by Duncan Coutts, co-founder and partner at Well-Typed. He’s both an experienced teacher and is involved in lots of commercial Haskell development projects at Well-Typed. He’s seen a lot of Haskell code, and knows perfectly which techniques and approaches work and which do not.

Well-Typed training courses

In general, our courses are very practical, but don’t shy away from theory where necessary. Our teachers are all active Haskell developers with not just training experience, but active development experience as well. In addition to these two courses in New York City, we regularly offer courses in London, and plan to offer courses in other European locations, too.

We also provide on-site training on requests nearly anywhere in the world. If you want to know more about our training or have any feedback or questions, have a look at our dedicated training page or just drop us a mail.